Rider Rights on Public Transit


Aug 29, 2018

Most of us, at one time or another, have taken public transit. When you don’t feel like taking your own car, or you don’t have access to one, these alternatives to driving present a convenient option for Albertans on-the-go. However, they’re not without their own risks. Just because you’re not behind the wheel, doesn’t mean you can’t suffer an injury while riding.

Mistakes and accidents happen, but things can get confusing when you’re hurt in an accident as a passenger. We’ve created this quick guide to take you through what an injury claim on public transit might look like. Keep in mind, the quickest way to find out your options is by contacting a personal injury lawyer. Know that we here at Litwiniuk & Company are standing by to help you through your difficult time.

Litwiniuk & Company - Public Transit Rights

Claims on Public Transit

Let’s say you’re riding a busy bus in downtown Calgary. You and your fellow travelers are crammed into every available nook and cranny. We’ve all been there. Suddenly, your bus collides with another vehicle and you’re unable to keep your balance. You fall down and sustain an injury. What’s next?

Fault

Odds are, you probably didn’t see which vehicle was at fault. For that reason, it’s important for you to attempt to get your bus operator’s information, along with the vehicle registration number, license plate number, insurance company and policy number of the other drivers involved. This way, you’ll have information from all parties involved, which will help when seeking compensation from the at-fault driver.

Evidence

Evidence to show fault in your transit personal injury claim will come from two sources. The first is witnesses, who can help corroborate your recounting of the events.
The second is video evidence. Most public busses have internal and external security cameras, which can help confirm the details of the accident and support your claim. By submitting a Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Request, you and your personal injury lawyer can seek to obtain this footage from the municipal government.

Compensation

If your bus driver is found to be at least partially at fault, you’ll be suing the owner and operator of the public transit you were on – most likely the municipal government. Since the city is responsible for public transit in most North American cities, they are liable for damages that their drivers cause.

When another vehicle is at fault, your recourse is to sue that driver’s insurer. Avoid discussing your injuries with anyone but the police, medical professionals and your personal injury lawyer. Third parties like insurance adjusters are out for a quick settlement, which you may be tempted to take if you don’t know what you deserve.

Protect yourself. Call a Personal Injury Lawyer.

Your best bet is to contact a personal injury lawyer as soon as possible after being injured on public transit. The accident injury lawyers at Litwiniuk & Company have more than 42 years of experience in fighting for injured Albertans when they need help the most. We know how to deal with insurance companies to get you the compensation you need and deserve, and we’ll deal with the tricky paperwork, like the FOIP request, so you don’t have to. Don’t hesitate to contact us if you’ve been injured on public transit and aren’t sure where to turn.

 


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    IMPORTANT! If you agree to an insurance company’s settlement offer, you give up your legal right to pursue a personal injury claim. It is best to assess the full extent of your injuries and how they will affect your life before you accept an offer. Please note that you have a maximum of two years from the date of the accident to file an injury claim in Alberta.

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