Are Amusement Parks Liable If You Get Injured?


Jun 19, 2024

From the heart-stopping drops of roller coasters to the dizzying spins of teacup rides, amusement parks offer a whirlwind of thrills for visitors of all ages. But amid the fun and excitement, accidents can happen. If you are injured on a ride, what are your legal options? Can you file an injury claim? Let’s find out.  

Amusement parks have a legal responsibility to ensure your safety.  

In Alberta, there are regulations and safety standards in place for amusement rides to ensure the safety and well-being of visitors. These regulations encompass everything from ride inspections to employee training, with the overarching goal of preventing accidents and minimizing risks. Despite these measures, incidents can still occur. If you suffered an injury due to negligence or a failure to adhere to these standards, you may have grounds for a personal injury claim.  

Were you injured at an amusement park due to negligence?  

One of the key factors in determining liability in amusement park injury claims is establishing negligence. Negligence includes things like the failure to exercise reasonable care, resulting in harm to another person. In the context of amusement parks, negligence can take various forms, such as…  

  • Inadequate maintenance of rides  
  • Improper employee training  
  • Failure to warn visitors of potential hazards  

Who’s legally responsible if you are injured?  

Alberta’s Occupiers’ Liability Act places a “duty of care” on the owners and operators of amusement parks. This means that they are responsible for taking reasonable steps to ensure the safety of visitors on their premises. If it can be proven that the park failed to fulfill this duty of care, resulting in injury, you may be entitled to compensation for damages such as medical expenses, lost wages, pain and suffering, and more.  

DID YOU KNOW? In Alberta, you generally have up to two years from the date of an accident to file a personal injury claim, or your right to do so is lost forever. But it’s important not to wait, as there may be other important deadlines or circumstances that may affect the deadline or your claim.  

Injured on a ride outside of Alberta or Canada?  

What happens if you’re injured in an amusement park ride outside of the province or country (such as at Six Flags in the United States)? In most cases, you still have legal options. While a person injured in an amusement park outside of Alberta may still have the ability to file an injury claim, the specifics of the case would depend on the laws and legal procedures of the jurisdiction where the injury occurred.  

Injured in an amusement park accident? We can help.  

If you or someone you love was injured at an amusement park as a result of carelessness or negligence, you may be able to file an injury claim. We have helped thousands of injured Albertans get the compensation they deserve, and we can help you too.  

It won’t cost you anything to speak to a lawyer. We never bill by the hour and if you do choose to file a claim, you don’t pay us anything unless and until your claim is resolved. Contact us today to book a free consultation.  

PSA: Help keep others safe! By reporting the incident (e.g. company or police), you can help prevent similar accidents in the future and ensure that appropriate investigations take place.  

 


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    IMPORTANT! If you agree to an insurance company’s settlement offer, you give up your legal right to pursue a personal injury claim. It is best to assess the full extent of your injuries and how they will affect your life before you accept an offer. Please note that you have a maximum of two years from the date of the accident to file an injury claim in Alberta.

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